It may not feel like this is a small amount of cold. But then you remember that last year the Great Cold seasonal node was blessed with a -60 F windchill last year. It was cold enough that even we Minnesotans decided that we could stay home. My grocery store closed. It was very strange. Compared to that, the cold at the beginning of the year seems small indeed. The Small Cold seasonal node lasts from January 5th to January 19th.

The Wee Hours of Winter: The Small Cold Seasonal Node

It may not feel like this is a small amount of cold. But then you remember that last year the Great Cold seasonal node was blessed with a -60 F windchill last year. It was cold enough that even we Minnesotans decided that we could stay home. My grocery store closed. It was very strange.

Compared to that, the cold at the beginning of the year seems small indeed. The Small Cold seasonal node lasts from January 5th to January 19th.

Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it. Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe. Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Nourishing Winter Congee

Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it.

Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe.

Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Staying warm after the Winter Solstice

Wow, friends. It’s definitely winter. I do like seasonal change but sub-zero temps can be a little much for even me.
How did you survive? Hot cocoa? Sauna? Hibernating under a blanket? (No really, I want to know so leave a comment below.)

I opted for hibernating. ‘Tis the season, after all. And it was while I was sitting on my couch with my mug of coffee I had a thought: we’ve already covered the basics of seasonal living. We’ve touched on every season. But do you know what we haven’t done? The seasonal nodes.

What are the seasonal nodes? Read on to find out.

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What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post with an exploration of the metal element. In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems. Without further ado, let’s get started! Featured image and cover photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

The Metal Element: Grief and Release

What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post!

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems.

October is a season of change and transformation. The days get shorter, the nights get longer and colder. Trees shed their leaves and their skeletal branches are a stark contrast to the pale, cloudy sky. Fall is the season of all things witchy. There has been a recent uptick in the number of people calling themselves witch and I think it’s because there is a call for us to change. People don’t seem to mean that they’re making a theological change to Wiccanism. Rather, they are embracing this power of transformation. “Witchiness” has become synonymous with feminine-power (though not all witches identify as female!). It’s raising up our voices, taking care of ourselves, and yeah, sometimes sage sticks, tarot cards, and crystals. So to celebrate this witchy season I want to share with you some of my favorite books about female empowerment, healing, and transformation. Featured image and cover photo by Spencer Selover from Pexels

Five Witchy Books for Fall

October is a season of change and transformation. The days get shorter, the nights get longer and colder. Trees shed their leaves and their skeletal branches are a stark contrast to the pale, cloudy sky. Fall is the season of all things witchy.

There has been a recent uptick in the number of people calling themselves witch and I think it’s because there is a call for us to change. People don’t seem to mean that they’re making a theological change to Wiccanism. Rather, they are embracing this power of transformation.

“Witchiness” has become synonymous with feminine-power (though not all witches identify as female!). It’s raising up our voices, taking care of ourselves, and yeah, sometimes sage sticks, tarot cards, and crystals.

So to celebrate this witchy season I want to share with you some of my favorite books about female empowerment, healing, and transformation.

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It’s fall and our feeds are inundated with changing leaves, sweaters, socks, and cups of tea. But did you know that the seasonal draw to a perfect cup of tea is actually a remedy? Tea has long been praised as a healing beverage across cultures and in this post, I’m going to discuss the healing properties of tea from a Chinese medical and seasonal living perspective. Cover photo and featured image by koko rahmadie via Pexels

The Healing Power of a Cup of Tea

It’s fall and our feeds are inundated with changing leaves, sweaters, socks, and cups of tea. But did you know that the seasonal draw to a perfect cup of tea is actually a remedy?

Tea has long been praised as a healing beverage across cultures and in this post, I’m going to discuss the healing properties of tea from a Chinese medical and seasonal living perspective.

The days are getting shorter and colder as we move from the autumnal equinox to the winter solstice. For many of us, that means hot cocoa, eggnog, sweaters, and boots. But for some, it means that a dark dragon rears its head: seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder is a common type of depression that occurs at a particular time during the year. For most people, it happens during the shorter and darker times of the year. Many people experience it during the winter but some start seeing symptoms as early as October. Like with many chronic conditions, pre-emptive care can mean lessening or completely eliminating symptoms. Check out these six ways to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. Cover photo and featured image by Lisa Fotios from Pexels

Adjusting to Autumn: Preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder

The days are getting shorter and colder as we move from the autumnal equinox to the winter solstice. For many of us, that means hot cocoa, eggnog, sweaters, and boots. But for some, it means that a dark dragon rears its head: seasonal affective disorder.

Seasonal affective disorder is a common type of depression that occurs at a particular time during the year. For most people, it happens during the shorter and darker times of the year. Many people experience it during the winter but some start seeing symptoms as early as October.

Like with many chronic conditions, pre-emptive care can mean lessening or completely eliminating symptoms. Check out these six ways to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder.

We're coming up on the halfway point of liver season and I promise I'll start talking about something else with the next blog post. But understanding the elements of Classical Chinese medicine is crucial to recognizing patterns of imbalance in yourself.

Finding your Flow: Balancing liver disharmonies with Classical Chinese Medicine

We’re coming up on the halfway point of liver season and I promise I’ll start talking about something else with the next blog post. But understanding the elements of Classical Chinese medicine is crucial to recognizing patterns of imbalance in yourself.

That’s why this year my focus is on teaching you the foundations, so that you can bring seasonal living together with learning what your body needs, and what season your body is in. Because while we are part of the world, we are not always in synch with it.

This blog post is about imbalances in the liver system and what it looks like when our qi isn’t flowing optimally.

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