Kidney disharmonies and imbalances are the heart of many people’s fertility struggles. The kidneys, when combined with the liver, form the root of how hormones are developed and move throughout the body. The kidneys themselves govern our growth and development as well as our reproductive potential. And the kidneys are also one of the only systems that have a predictable pattern of change throughout our lifetimes. Understanding kidney disharmonies isn’t about preventing them like it is with liver and lung disharmonies. It’s about balancing changes to make the process of aging more comfortable and preventing that change from negatively impacting other organ systems. Because the kidney system is literally the foundation of our bodies and all of our yin and yang, I’ve divided it into two parts. Today we will discuss kidney yin deficiencies and imbalances and tomorrow’s post will discuss kidney yang disharmonies. Featured image and cover photo by Irina Iriser from Pexels

Kidney Disharmonies: Foundations of Yin

Kidney disharmonies and imbalances are the heart of many people’s fertility struggles. The kidneys, when combined with the liver, form the root of how hormones are developed and move throughout the body. The kidneys themselves govern our growth and development as well as our reproductive potential. And the kidneys are also one of the only systems that have a predictable pattern of change throughout our lifetimes.

Emotions are complicated. Psychology is complicated. Humans, well, we’re complicated. This season we’ve been diving deeply into emotional and psychological disorders on the blog. We started on Halloween with Sun Si Miao’s ghost points, the ancient treatment for conditions like addiction, bipolar, depression and anxiety. Last week we talked about the shen, or how we understand spirit and consciousness in Chinese medicine. But this week I thought we would get back to acupuncture and discuss an interesting group of points – the outer shu points – and tie them back to their impact on the shen.

The Outer Shu: A Natural Approach to Mental Health

Emotions are complicated. Psychology is complicated. Humans, well, we’re complicated.

This season we’ve been diving deeply into emotional and psychological disorders on the blog. We started on Halloween with Sun Si Miao’s ghost points, the ancient treatment for conditions like addiction, bipolar, depression and anxiety.

Last week we talked about the shen, or how we understand spirit and consciousness in Chinese medicine.

But this week I thought we would get back to acupuncture and discuss an interesting group of points – the outer shu points – and tie them back to their impact on the shen.

I have always been a huge fan of journaling. Rather, I’ve been a huge fan of collecting pretty journals that sit, mostly empty, on my shelf because they’re meant for a particular subject. It takes a long time to fill up a “business journal” and a “gratitude journal” and a “clinic journal” plus every other type of journal you could conceive of. So when I heard Katie Dalebout’s podcast on Being Boss I was naturally intrigued. I think what convinced me to buy the book was when she talked about her journal collection. At one point, Dalebout had the same problem I had. Tons of journals with tons of empty pages. But because of how Dalebout breaks down her journaling “tools”, empty pages become less of a problem. Partially because it stops mattering what you put in what journal. In fact, for some tools she recommends nothing fancy at all and uses a legal pad. Some tools aren’t even in journals at all, but rather in a phone or a jar (no, really.) By the end of the podcast episode I knew what I wanted for my birthday – I wanted to get Let it Out and start using up my journals. But in the meantime, I needed to find out who Katie Dalebout was and what she was all about.

Book Review: Let It Out by Katie Dalebout

I have always been a huge fan of journaling. Rather, I’ve been a huge fan of collecting pretty journals that sit, mostly empty, on my shelf because they’re meant for a particular subject. It takes a long time to fill up a “business journal” and a “gratitude journal” and a “clinic journal” plus every other type of journal you could conceive of. So when I heard Katie Dalebout’s podcast on Being Boss I was naturally intrigued.

I think what convinced me to buy the book was when she talked about her journal collection. At one point, Dalebout had the same problem I had. Tons of journals with tons of empty pages.

But because of how Dalebout breaks down her journaling “tools”, empty pages become less of a problem. Partially because it stops mattering what you put in what journal. In fact, for some tools she recommends nothing fancy at all and uses a legal pad. Some tools aren’t even in journals at all, but rather in a phone or a jar (no, really.)

By the end of the podcast episode I knew what I wanted for my birthday – I wanted to get Let it Out (affiliate link) and start using up my journals. But in the meantime, I needed to find out who Katie Dalebout was and what she was all about.

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