Toys ooze out of their boxes. Books are stacked on top of books, a mishmash of titles and discarded book jackets. You have three can openers and can only find one. Oh yes, it’s time to declutter. Off to Pinterest you go; minimalist moms and decluttering divas throw out their suggestions: One room at a time One category at a time The whole house in one layer One week, once, and it’s clean forever Fifteen minutes a day and you’ll get there eventually Konmari So you roll up your sleeves, ready to whip your home into shape. But kids don’t put their toys back. Dishes need to be done. You need to get work done. And, shockingly, you are the only one interested in decluttering. Eventually days turn into weeks. Maybe you’re discouraged because your one perfect room makes the rest of the house look like a pit. Maybe the one category at a time method isn’t noticeable because you just cleaned around other clutter. Eventually, as you tend to life, your decluttering project falls to the wayside because you prioritized other things and instead of a clean, Pinterest-perfect home you are left with guilt and a sense of failure. Featured image and cover photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

The Decluttering Experiment

So you roll up your sleeves, ready to whip your home into shape. But kids don’t put their toys back. Dishes need to be done. You need to get work done. And, shockingly, you are the only one interested in decluttering.

Eventually days turn into weeks. Maybe you’re discouraged because your one perfect room makes the rest of the house look like a pit. Maybe the one category at a time method isn’t noticeable because you just cleaned around other clutter.

Eventually, as you tend to life, your decluttering project falls to the wayside because you prioritized other things and instead of a clean, Pinterest-perfect home you are left with guilt and a sense of failure.

What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post with an exploration of the metal element. In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems. Without further ado, let’s get started! Featured image and cover photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

The Metal Element: Grief and Release

What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post!

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems.

It’s fall and our feeds are inundated with changing leaves, sweaters, socks, and cups of tea. But did you know that the seasonal draw to a perfect cup of tea is actually a remedy? Tea has long been praised as a healing beverage across cultures and in this post, I’m going to discuss the healing properties of tea from a Chinese medical and seasonal living perspective. Cover photo and featured image by koko rahmadie via Pexels

The Healing Power of a Cup of Tea

It’s fall and our feeds are inundated with changing leaves, sweaters, socks, and cups of tea. But did you know that the seasonal draw to a perfect cup of tea is actually a remedy?

Tea has long been praised as a healing beverage across cultures and in this post, I’m going to discuss the healing properties of tea from a Chinese medical and seasonal living perspective.

The days are getting shorter and colder as we move from the autumnal equinox to the winter solstice. For many of us, that means hot cocoa, eggnog, sweaters, and boots. But for some, it means that a dark dragon rears its head: seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder is a common type of depression that occurs at a particular time during the year. For most people, it happens during the shorter and darker times of the year. Many people experience it during the winter but some start seeing symptoms as early as October. Like with many chronic conditions, pre-emptive care can mean lessening or completely eliminating symptoms. Check out these six ways to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. Cover photo and featured image by Lisa Fotios from Pexels

Adjusting to Autumn: Preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder

The days are getting shorter and colder as we move from the autumnal equinox to the winter solstice. For many of us, that means hot cocoa, eggnog, sweaters, and boots. But for some, it means that a dark dragon rears its head: seasonal affective disorder.

Seasonal affective disorder is a common type of depression that occurs at a particular time during the year. For most people, it happens during the shorter and darker times of the year. Many people experience it during the winter but some start seeing symptoms as early as October.

Like with many chronic conditions, pre-emptive care can mean lessening or completely eliminating symptoms. Check out these six ways to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder.

Are you feeling resistant to the coming winter? Living seasonally helps you settle into the rhythm of the year and autumn helps you prepare for winter properly

Autumn: Living with nature in the season of harvest

Leaves crunch under footsteps. Pumpkins spring up in doorways and along sidewalks. And the smell of woodsmoke lies just under the smells of spice and frost. Oh yes, autumn is here.

Autumn is the season of harvest – the season for us to look back at what we’ve made, keep the things that serve us, and release the things that don’t. The season of soups and chilis. And the season of preparation.

Learning to live seasonally is the ultimate preventative medicine. It’s a lifestyle that follows the rhythms of nature around you to prepare you for the pitfalls of the season ahead.

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This simple and healthy dessert has only a few ingredients - baked pears, walnuts, ginger and honey. But it's simplicity is based in Chinese Medicine.

Baked Pears with Walnuts and Ginger-infused Honey

You have finally gotten over this year’s flu (with the help of this cold fighting broth, perhaps) and now you have a new battle to fight:

The dry and bloody nose.

Every winter families dig through their storage spaces and garages for their humidifiers with the hopes of fighting off cracked and painful noses and lips. Sometimes we’re successful, most times we are not.

I have a solution for you. This simple recipe is a delicious dessert of baked pears and honey can help with the dreaded winter dryness.

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