What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post with an exploration of the metal element. In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems. Without further ado, let’s get started! Featured image and cover photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

The Metal Element: Grief and Release

What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post!

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems.

Today I’m going to step outside of Traditional Chinese Medicine and talk about something thoroughly Western: flower essences. Believe it or not, flower essences used to be cutting edge technology. Riding the wave of vaccine development and homeopathy, Dr. Edward Bach devoted his life to finding a simple, affordable way for people to treat common emotional and spiritual ailments. Flower essences are what got me through my last year of acupuncture school and they are magical. I have no other word for it. Like I said in the last blog post, we don’t know why many things in Western modern medicine work. The reality is, we don’t have to know why they work to know they do. By the end of this blog post I want you to know a bit more about what flower essences are, their history and how they are used. Cover photo and featured image by Irina Iriser from Pexels

What are flower essences?

Today I’m going to step outside of Traditional Chinese Medicine and talk about something thoroughly Western: flower essences. Believe it or not, flower essences used to be cutting edge technology. Riding the wave of vaccine development and homeopathy, Dr. Edward Bach devoted his life to finding a simple, affordable way for people to treat common emotional and spiritual ailments. Flower essences are what got me through my last year of acupuncture school and they are magical. I have no other word for it. Like I said in the last blog post, we don’t know why many things in Western modern medicine work. The reality is, we don’t have to know why they work to know they do. By the end of this blog post I want you to know a bit more about what flower essences are, their history and how they are used. Cover photo and featured image by Irina Iriser from Pexels

Single serving iced red raspberry leaf tea. Photo by Wahid Hacene via Pexels

A More Refreshing Red Raspberry Leaf Tea

As with many natural interventions there’s a bit of controversy on whether or not red raspberry leaf tea has any impact on labor. Some studies show it can shorten labor and lessen the need for interventions. In fact, a study published in the Journal of Nurse Midwifery found some 63% of certified nurse midwives used red raspberry leaf as part of their natural labor induction plan.

Other studies show that at the highest levels it can actually inhibit contractions, lengthening labors. It’s important to point out for this study the doses “at the highest level” are at a level no human would consume with a mug of tea a day. At worst you have a tasty tea that has no effect. Also note that rats are not humans and their physiology will handle things slightly differently.

Conventional and folk wisdom treat it as a “women’s herb”. It’s great to help menstrual cramps, keep the uterus healthy and may help with fertility. The only caution I regularly see with red raspberry leaf is to not consume it in the first trimester.