Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it. Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe. Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Nourishing Winter Congee

Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it.

Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe.

Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Hey, wow. A third Sunday round-up. This might actually become a thing! Is anyone else notoriously bad at saying you want to start doing a thing and then not doing it? It can’t just be me. Anyway, this Sunday round up includes bed-sharing while breastfeeding, a local man working for big change, seed cycling, and my favorite bibimbap recipe that’s nourishing for your body AND your budget. Featured image and cover photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Sunday Round Up: Bed-sharing, male doulas, and seed cycling

Hey, wow. A third Sunday round-up. This might actually become a thing!

Is anyone else notoriously bad at saying you want to start doing a thing and then not doing it? It can’t just be me.

Anyway, this Sunday round up includes bed-sharing while breastfeeding, a local man working for big change, seed cycling, and my favorite bibimbap recipe that’s nourishing for your body AND your budget.

Fresh Red Raspberry Leaf Tea

Last weekend I was sitting in my mother in law’s house and I found myself craving a cup of red raspberry leaf tea. Sometimes your body just tells you that you need something. One problem: I was in the middle of the woods, half an hour away from a store that might have red raspberry leaf tea.

But I was a five minute walk from a raspberry patch.

I love red raspberry leaf tea in general, but there is something about a fresh tea that is so much more bright and whole. So for today’s blog post I wanted to show you how I made my North Woods fresh Red Raspberry Leaf tea and how you can make some of your own.

Last weekend I was sitting in my mother in law’s house and I found myself craving a cup of red raspberry leaf tea. Sometimes your body just tells you that you need something. One problem: I was in the middle of the woods, half an hour away from a store that might have red raspberry leaf tea.

But I was a five minute walk from a raspberry patch.

I love red raspberry leaf tea in general, but there is something about a fresh tea that is so much more bright and whole. So for today’s blog post I wanted to show you how I made my North Woods fresh Red Raspberry Leaf tea and how you can make some of your own.
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Check out this hearty, protein rich oatmeal recipe to start your day off right and help support breast milk production

Lactation Boosting Oatmeal Recipe

If there is one constant in every culture on the planet, it’s that food is used to heal.

The recipes that we use for our best health are often the ones that have been passed down through the generations. But there is another common thing that happens to recipes as they’re passed along – they change.

It’s natural. As we experience and integrate the wisdom of other cultures we experience new foods and ideas. We take them and add them to the things we’ve carried with us, changing them and evolving them.

For me, I’m constantly tweaking recipes because 1) I am a food therapy nerd and 2) I’m always looking for ways to make healthy food taste good.

That’s where this recipe comes from. I wanted a way to make the most nourishing porridge recipe possible. Breastfeeding mothers need ways to get as many calories and nutrients in their mouths as possible and this oatmeal recipe is a great way to do it.

If there is one constant in every culture on the planet, it’s that food is used to heal.  The recipes that we use for our best health are often the ones that have been passed down through the generations. But there is another common thing that happens to recipes as they’re passed along – they change.  It’s natural. As we experience and integrate the wisdom of other cultures we experience new foods and ideas. We take them and add them to the things we’ve carried with us, changing them and evolving them.  For me, I’m constantly tweaking recipes because 1) I am a food therapy nerd and 2) I’m always looking for ways to make healthy food taste good.  That’s where this recipe comes from. I wanted a way to make the most nourishing porridge recipe possible. Breastfeeding mothers need ways to get as many calories and nutrients in their mouths as possible and this oatmeal recipe is a great way to do it.
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This simple and healthy dessert has only a few ingredients - baked pears, walnuts, ginger and honey. But it's simplicity is based in Chinese Medicine.

Baked Pears with Walnuts and Ginger-infused Honey

You have finally gotten over this year’s flu (with the help of this cold fighting broth, perhaps) and now you have a new battle to fight:

The dry and bloody nose.

Every winter families dig through their storage spaces and garages for their humidifiers with the hopes of fighting off cracked and painful noses and lips. Sometimes we’re successful, most times we are not.

I have a solution for you. This simple recipe is a delicious dessert of baked pears and honey can help with the dreaded winter dryness.

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My family's cold fighting home remedy

Three herb broth: a traditional cold fighting remedy

Any pregnant woman can attest: having a cold while pregnant is awful. You already can’t breathe normally, but yeah sure, let’s add a stuffy nose and a cough to the mix!

Of course you don’t have to be pregnant to be miserable with a cold and you certainly don’t have to be pregnant to be familiar with them. According to the CDC an adult will average 2-3 colds per year, each lasting an average of 7-10 days. Since the cold is caused by a virus you can’t take anything for it either – it’s just a matter of rest, fluids and waiting.

What if I told you that you could cut that in half? And that if you acted quickly enough you could even nip the disease in the bud before it even got annoying. And that all it would take is a trip to the grocery store?

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