This seasonal node is called "The Great Cold" (which this year, is unseasonably warm and snowy but what are you going to do.) Usually, this is the coldest time of year; Minnesotans tend to think of February as the month where it's too cold to snow. The yang that was reborn at the Winter Solstice is getting stronger as the days are getting longer. People are starting to get restless and depending on their pattern diagnosis, their seasonal affective disorder is kicking up a notch. Living seasonally for these last two weeks of winter can go a long way to alleviating that increased anxiety and restlessness and set you up for success for the coming year.

Gearing up for the Great Cold Seasonal Node

This seasonal node is called “The Great Cold” (which this year, is unseasonably warm and snowy but what are you going to do.) Usually, this is the coldest time of year; Minnesotans tend to think of February as the month where it’s too cold to snow.

The yang that was reborn at the Winter Solstice is getting stronger as the days are getting longer. People are starting to get restless and depending on their pattern diagnosis, their seasonal affective disorder is kicking up a notch.

Living seasonally for these last two weeks of winter can go a long way to alleviating that increased anxiety and restlessness and set you up for success for the coming year.

It may not feel like this is a small amount of cold. But then you remember that last year the Great Cold seasonal node was blessed with a -60 F windchill last year. It was cold enough that even we Minnesotans decided that we could stay home. My grocery store closed. It was very strange. Compared to that, the cold at the beginning of the year seems small indeed. The Small Cold seasonal node lasts from January 5th to January 19th.

The Wee Hours of Winter: The Small Cold Seasonal Node

It may not feel like this is a small amount of cold. But then you remember that last year the Great Cold seasonal node was blessed with a -60 F windchill last year. It was cold enough that even we Minnesotans decided that we could stay home. My grocery store closed. It was very strange.

Compared to that, the cold at the beginning of the year seems small indeed. The Small Cold seasonal node lasts from January 5th to January 19th.

Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it. Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe. Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Nourishing Winter Congee

Last week we introduced the concept of seasonal nodes and how tweaking your lifestyle and diet every couple of weeks can not only preserve your health but improve it.

Since the focus of this seasonal node is preserving yang qi by supporting the spleen I thought it would be an ideal time to share a yang tonifying recipe.

Be warned: the recipe is pretty bland (it’s mostly rice and water) but if you eat it as is or with some tasty root veggies or eggs, I think you’ll find that you’ll feel warm from your fingers to your toes in no time.

Staying warm after the Winter Solstice

Wow, friends. It’s definitely winter. I do like seasonal change but sub-zero temps can be a little much for even me.
How did you survive? Hot cocoa? Sauna? Hibernating under a blanket? (No really, I want to know so leave a comment below.)

I opted for hibernating. ‘Tis the season, after all. And it was while I was sitting on my couch with my mug of coffee I had a thought: we’ve already covered the basics of seasonal living. We’ve touched on every season. But do you know what we haven’t done? The seasonal nodes.

What are the seasonal nodes? Read on to find out.

Just like you can preserve your health and vitality by living seasonal, you can fine-tune that practice by using the seasonal nodes. So, if you’re on board with winter living and you’re ready for the next step, let’s get cracking!
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Sunday Round-Up 5: Winter is here

November is upon us and the first snows have fallen!

I am currently sitting here this Sunday morning with a cup of coffee and my favorite sweater and fleece lined leggings (and a bit of French silk pie because I am an awful example for healthy breakfasts).

This week breastfeeding became legal in all 50 states which is a huge, if incredibly delayed) win! Check out this and other things I found on the wide and scary internet in this week’s Sunday round up!

Check out these blogtober posts to understand more about how I approach women's health, acupuncture, doula work (and other birth work), herbalism and more!

The Decluttering Experiment

So you roll up your sleeves, ready to whip your home into shape. But kids don’t put their toys back. Dishes need to be done. You need to get work done. And, shockingly, you are the only one interested in decluttering.

Eventually days turn into weeks. Maybe you’re discouraged because your one perfect room makes the rest of the house look like a pit. Maybe the one category at a time method isn’t noticeable because you just cleaned around other clutter.

Eventually, as you tend to life, your decluttering project falls to the wayside because you prioritized other things and instead of a clean, Pinterest-perfect home you are left with guilt and a sense of failure.

The Metal Element: Grief and Release

What better time than blogtober to update the element series? This spring I expanded on the spring seasonal living post, adding additional information about the wood element and its disharmonies. Now that we are well and truly into autumn it’s time do expand the autumn seasonal living post!

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into the metal element, the element associated with autumn and growing yin. Later this month we’ll do a follow-up post on the disharmonies of the metal organ systems.

Check out these blogtober posts to understand more about how I approach women's health, acupuncture, doula work (and other birth work), herbalism and more!

The Healing Power of a Cup of Tea

It’s fall and our feeds are inundated with changing leaves, sweaters, socks, and cups of tea. But did you know that the seasonal draw to a perfect cup of tea is actually a remedy?

Tea has long been praised as a healing beverage across cultures and in this post, I’m going to discuss the healing properties of tea from a Chinese medical and seasonal living perspective.

Check out these blogtober posts to understand more about how I approach women's health, acupuncture, doula work (and other birth work), herbalism and more!

Adjusting to Autumn: Preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder

The days are getting shorter and colder as we move from the autumnal equinox to the winter solstice. For many of us, that means hot cocoa, eggnog, sweaters, and boots. But for some, it means that a dark dragon rears its head: seasonal affective disorder.

Seasonal affective disorder is a common type of depression that occurs at a particular time during the year. For most people, it happens during the shorter and darker times of the year. Many people experience it during the winter but some start seeing symptoms as early as October.

Like with many chronic conditions, pre-emptive care can mean lessening or completely eliminating symptoms. Check out these six ways to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder.