Happy Almost Winter, Minnesnowta! Any other season of the year and people give me the side-eye for an “early” season greeting. But in winter? Snow can fly as early as September! In fact, wasn’t it just last week we got our first flakes? And even if the snowflakes weren’t falling yet, the world around us is settling into a winter rhythm. Everything becomes quiet and still. The leaves have fallen, the grass is hibernating, jars of pickled herring pop up in pantries across the state. This spring, I broke the element of wood down in two blog posts – one about how things can be categorized as wood from a health perspective and another about how Chinese medicine looks at imbalances in the wood element. I did the same earlier this month for metal and metal disharmonies. This blog post will be doing the same for this season’s element, the element of Water. Featured image and cover photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

The Water Element: Foundations in the Depths

Happy Almost Winter, Minnesnowta!

Any other season of the year and people give me the side-eye for an “early” season greeting. But in winter? Snow can fly as early as September! In fact, wasn’t it just last week we got our first flakes?

And even if the snowflakes weren’t falling yet, the world around us is settling into a winter rhythm. Everything becomes quiet and still. The leaves have fallen, the grass is hibernating, jars of pickled herring pop up in pantries across the state.

This spring, I broke the element of wood down in two blog posts – one about how things can be categorized as wood from a health perspective and another about how Chinese medicine looks at imbalances in the wood element. I did the same earlier this month for metal and metal disharmonies.

This blog post will be doing the same for this season’s element, the element of Water.

The ancient Chinese referred to Winter as the "season of shutting and storing". TCM has so much wisdom about living seasonally, and Winter is just the start

Winter: Season of Stillness

When we think of the big picture of the year, there is the cold season and the warm season. Winter and summer. Yin and yang.

Of course, the year can be broken down further, into the four seasons: winter, spring, summer and autumn or even further, into the eight weather terms.

When we look at the seasons on the wheel and think about them in the context of the eight weather terms we can see how the most yin part of the year – the winter solstice – is the middle of winter. And that the winter solstice, being the depth of yin contains within it the seed of yang.